Little Notes FAQ

Questions about Baby Music Classes at Eugene Suzuki Music Academy

How young do you start?

You can start coming to class as soon as you are ready to leave the house with your youngster.

What could an infant possibly learn from this class?

Young babies are very observant and are already picking up on language and sound. For example, when babies start early they are already mastering several musical concepts by 1 year. Come and enjoy watching your baby’s attentiveness to the ringing tones of the glockenspiel, or the soothing sound of the rain stick.

Young children, even infants and newborns, are observing their surroundings and learning from those around them. They may not be able to display what they are learning, but even from a very young age there is learning taking place. A growing body of research backs this up.

On a personal note, my son Connor and husband Anthony have been attending Little Notes since Connor was 6 weeks old. As a young infant Connor would spend some parts of the class sleeping in his dad’s arms, but father and son still used Little Notes to share quality time and build their parent-child bond. We continue to use Little Notes songs and rhymes when playing with or soothing our son, now a rambunctious child who at 3 years old graduated from Little Notes to Suzuki Violin.

Why is music important?

Can you imagine your life without it? Music spans cultures throughout the world and is a wonderful form of artistic communication. By taking music with your child you are giving them a skill that will be valued for many years to come.

Why start at such a young age?

As more research is being done on our brains, we are finding out just how much young children are learning from their very first day. Participating in baby music classes is only fun, it is a great way to learn many skills such as language development, counting, and play acting.

We already know the Suzuki songs since my older child plays an instrument. Why would we need this class?

I am proud to say that the families involved in ESMA are very good about listening and their whole families are often involved in music. However, the Little Notes class is a chance for you and your baby to enjoy music together. We do things outside the Suzuki repertoire that prepare students for instrument lessons, but they also learn many life skills, such as how to take turns, how to share, patience, how to play a steady beat, and language exposure. Plus, as the parent, you get a chance to practice observation and share the fascination of learning.

What do you do in class?

The class is a mixture of movement, rhymes and songs. Almost every song has a specific instrument or prop that we use. Through the course of the class your child will learn how to fully master each song. Regular guest musicians also come in to share their instruments. A baby music class companion CD and booklet also help you get familiar with the songs.

I have a rambunctious toddler, will that be okay?

The class is designed for any age 0-3, so things move quickly and your child will be engaged with making music. It’s also a great opportunity to practice things like waiting and taking turns. If these things have been difficult, this may be just the class for you!

Can you accommodate my special needs child?

Suzuki classes can accommodate the needs of most children. Please contact me to discuss your child’s needs and how he or she can get the most out of our time together.

I’m not a musician and I don’t have a good voice. Do I need to sing?

The parent’s voice is an important part of class, but don’t worry about your singing ability. Most singing is done in the group and your child will be thrilled to hear your voice no matter your ability.

When are classes?

Little Notes is a once-a-week, one-hour class. Doors open 5 minutes before class begins.

See our Little Notes class schedule

How can I sign up for ESMA Baby Music Classes?

Fill out a Little Notes registration form. A trial class is $10, and infants are free up to 6 months.

Thanks, but this didn’t answer my question. What now?

No worries! Please contact us.


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